Anatomy and Things

Lauren here. This is my anatomy, nature, inspiration, and tutorial reblog blog. My art blog is over at puppy-chow, where I keep most of the things I draw, big or small.
alteredchances:

feliscanis:

this is so horrible. this poor chow is now opened up to sunburn and his coat may never grow back the same way again. post-clipping alopecia is problematic, and hideous. why would you do this when you can just get a smooth chow, or a dog that CAN be shaved without just ruining the coat? :(
please no, stop. you do not want this.

This is a common misconception. This does not ruin the coat. Post clipping alopecia is a preexisting issue, not caused by clipping the coat. Thyroid issues are the main cause of bad growth. Excluding alopecia, worst case is the fur grows back a bit slower. It doesn’t grow in a uniform length like a Poodle would, but the undercoat grows faster than the top coat. The short topcoat makes it look odd until it catches up. Again, that is not every case. It usually has to do with diet. If your dog eats crap food like Beneful it will take longer. If your dog eats better, you are very likely to see the coat grow in at a normal rate.The main concern is sunburn, which can be prevented. The full coat well taken care of, warms and cools the skin (weather appropriate), protects them from the sun, and actually keeps them cooler than a shaved coat would.While I always recommend taking care of the coat by getting the loose undercoat removed to allow the coat to function properly, shaving your dog is NOT bad. Some people can’t handle the fur. As a groomer, I would rather see a double coated dog shaved short because the owner didn’t want to brush, than see the dog matted to hell because the dog couldn’t brush. The later is much more uncomfortable.-Sincerely, a groomer has disproven this myth hundreds of times.

alteredchances:

feliscanis:

this is so horrible. this poor chow is now opened up to sunburn and his coat may never grow back the same way again. post-clipping alopecia is problematic, and hideous. why would you do this when you can just get a smooth chow, or a dog that CAN be shaved without just ruining the coat? :(

please no, stop. you do not want this.

This is a common misconception. This does not ruin the coat. Post clipping alopecia is a preexisting issue, not caused by clipping the coat. Thyroid issues are the main cause of bad growth. Excluding alopecia, worst case is the fur grows back a bit slower. It doesn’t grow in a uniform length like a Poodle would, but the undercoat grows faster than the top coat. The short topcoat makes it look odd until it catches up. Again, that is not every case. It usually has to do with diet. If your dog eats crap food like Beneful it will take longer. If your dog eats better, you are very likely to see the coat grow in at a normal rate.

The main concern is sunburn, which can be prevented. The full coat well taken care of, warms and cools the skin (weather appropriate), protects them from the sun, and actually keeps them cooler than a shaved coat would.

While I always recommend taking care of the coat by getting the loose undercoat removed to allow the coat to function properly, shaving your dog is NOT bad. Some people can’t handle the fur. As a groomer, I would rather see a double coated dog shaved short because the owner didn’t want to brush, than see the dog matted to hell because the dog couldn’t brush. The later is much more uncomfortable.

-Sincerely, a groomer has disproven this myth hundreds of times.

(Source: glam-health)

antinwo:

Occupy Monsanto

woah what? Since when has GMOs killed bees? The things killing bees are the commercial industry of trying to make as much food as possible, shipping hundreds of hives across-country packed tightly together on a truck with no ability to leave or excrete and allowing themselves to be exposed to various host parasites and bacteria, the fact that they are pressured into constantly moving in the first place, various pesticides and fungicides sprayed while bees are working and pollinating, stress, and other things that I can’t recall off-hand. But there is NO correlation between bees dying and GMOs, but there are a TON of correlations between colony collapse disorder and the things I mentioned above.

If you want to know more, the documentary More than Honey has a lot to say on it, and it never once mentions GMO foods.

(via lampfaced)

we-are-star-stuff:

The Most Unfortunate Design Flaws in the Human Body
Sometimes evolution is stupid, and the human body is proof. Here are the most problematic physical and behavioral “scars of evolution” we humans have to deal with.
In some respects, these “scars” can be seen as vestigial traits, but that’s not quite accurate. Rather, they’re examples of the various trade-offs and side-effects of evolution. They’re also not physical or psychological limitations per se (like our poor sense of smell or inability to grasp large numbers — those traits weren’t adaptive in our recent evolutionary past).
The Dual Function of the Pharynx
This is one of the most problematic “features” of the human body — and the cause of innumerable deaths throughout human history. Like many other primates, we’re forced to use the same anatomical structure for both ingestion and respiration. But when obstructed, airflow is blocked, which can lead to choking, and in some cases, death.
Our Inability to Biosynthesize Vitamin C
Vitamin C plays a crucial role as an anti-oxidant and in collagen synthesis. But certain animals, such as primates, guinea pigs, and some bats and birds, have completely lost the ability to synthesize this compound. So, when Vitamin C-rich food sources are scarce, such as fruits, we experience a weakened immune response.
Also, because we can’t make all the vitamins we need, we carry a host of deadly bacteria in our bowels, which produce them for us. But when this process is disrupted, like a hole in the intestine, it can flare into peritonitis.
The Close Proximity of our Genitals to our Rectum
Not only is this aesthetically displeasing, it’s also unhygienic. Combined with our short urethras — especially in women — this leads to frequent urinary tract and bladder infections (UTIs) (remember, front to back, ladies).
Our Multi-Function Genitals
Relatedly, our genitals are forced to perform multiple functions. While on the one hand it can be seen as conservation in design, it creates health problems. Again, it’s unhygienic. For women, sexual intercourse pushes bacteria further into the urethra, leading to UTIs. Additionally, both men and women can contract UTIs from two sexually transmitted bacteria, chlamydia and mycoplasma. And of course, for women, this is also the part of the body where, in addition to sex and urination, newborn babies come out.
The Extremely Narrow Human Birth Canal
Speaking of which, human females have an unreasonably narrow birth canal, resulting in significantly increased risks to both mother and child during birth. In fact, death in childbirth used to be the leading cause of death for women during their reproductive years. This is a consequence of our quick evolutionary leap from quadrupeds to bipeds, resulting in our narrow pelvis — the passage through which newborn babies pass.
Our Over-Loaded Lower Backs
This is also a consequence of our transition from four-legged to two-legged creatures. According to paleoanthropologist Bruce Latimer of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio,

When humans stood upright, they took a spine that had evolved to be stiff for climbing and moving in trees and rotated it 90 degrees, so it was vertical. But so as not to obstruct the birth canal and to get the torso balanced above our feet, the spine has to curve inwards, creating the hollow of our backs. That’s why our spines are shaped like an “S.” All that curving, with the weight of the head and stuff we carry stacked on top, creates pressure that causes back problems. “If you take care of it, your spine will get you through to about 40 or 50” said Latimer. “After that, you’re on your own.”

The Overly Complicated Human Foot
Anthropologist Jeremy DeSilva of Boston University put it this way:

Starting with the foot, DeSilva held up a cast with 26 bones and said: “You wouldn’t design it out of 26 moving parts.” Our feet have so many bones because our ape-like ancestors needed flexible feet to grasp branches. But as they moved out of the trees and began walking upright on the ground the foot had to become more stable, and the big toe, which was no longer opposable, aligned itself with the other toes and our ancestors developed an arch to work as a shock absorber. “The foot was modified to remain rigid” said DeSilva. But the bottom line was that our foot still has a lot of room to twist inwards and outwards, and our arches collapse. This results in: ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, shin splints, and broken ankles. These are not modern problems; fossils show broken ankles that have healed as far back as 3 million years ago.
A better design for upright walking and running, DeSilva said, would be a foot and ankle like an ostrich. An ostrich’s ankle and lower leg bones are fused into a single structure, and their foot has only two toes that aid in running. “Why can’t I have a foot like that?” asked DeSilva. One reason is that ostriches trace their upright locomotion back 230 million years to the age of dinosaurs, while our ancestors walked upright just 5 million years ago.

The “Blind Spot” in Our Eyes
Our so-called “blind spot” is the result of a quirk that happens during embryological development. To deal with this, we’ve had to evolve elaborate and costly perception-correcting mechanisms. Esther Inglis-Arkell describes it like this:

Light gets into the eye by passing through the pupil. It hits the retina at the back of the eye. The retina is covered with light-sensing proteins. They relay what they sense to the optic nerve which carries the information back into the brain. The problem is, the optic nerve ends in the field of the retina itself. It creates a dark spot. Most of the time, the other eye will see what’s happening in its partner’s blind, but if the blind spots overlap while looking at a certain object, or if the person is only looking through one eye, the brain just fills in the spot looking at the surrounding picture.

A Single Set of Adult Teeth
This is where evolution got unreasonably cheap on us, providing humans with just one set of teeth for our entire adult lives. Once we hit 35, our teeth start to go — one of many signs that evolution primed us for reproduction, followed by a brief period of child-rearing, and pretty much nothing else.
Our fondness for sweet, salty, and fatty foods
Our bodies need sugar, salt, and fat — just not in extreme quantities. But in a state of nature, these foods are often scarce or difficult to preserve. That’s why we find these food unreasonably delicious and irresistible. But most of us now live in a world of tremendous abundance, and we consume these foods in ridiculous quantities, leading to all sorts of modern health problems.
Tribalism
Humans have a kind of ingrained fear or distrust of the “out-group”. It’s a previously adaptive trait that binds small groups of individuals together and prevents them from wandering off or joining other groups. But it also leads to ethnocentrism and divisions between groups. Studies show that oxytocin, while strengthening feelings of trust between individuals, increases fear of “the other”. This characteristic was obviously important back when we lived in family clans or tribal arrangements, but today it leads to all sorts of social problems, including racism, prejudice, and our inability to empathize with people we don’t immediately know.
Any Number of Cognitive Biases
Many of our cognitive biases — annoying glitches in our thinking that cause us to make questionable decisions and reach erroneous conclusions — are a consequence of our limited intelligence and predisposed tendencies. Examples include the confirmation bias (we love to agree with people who agree with us), our tendency to neglect or misjudge probability, and the status-quo bias (we often make choices that guarantee that things remain the same). Some of these are adaptive traits, but others are simply cognitive deficiencies.
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
This is an example of how we’ve potentially pathologized a perfectly “normal” human psychological characteristic. Because ADHD appears to have a genetic component (it affects about 5% of school-aged children), questions have been raised about its prior role as a trait required for survival, namely its adaptive function in hunter, fighter, and wader theories. But today, we see it as something maladaptive — something that needs to be treated. Put another way, and like our penchant for sweet, salty, and fatty foods, it’s a trait that’s not so much nonoptimal as it’s ill suited for present-day society.
[source]

we-are-star-stuff:

The Most Unfortunate Design Flaws in the Human Body

Sometimes evolution is stupid, and the human body is proof. Here are the most problematic physical and behavioral “scars of evolution” we humans have to deal with.

In some respects, these “scars” can be seen as vestigial traits, but that’s not quite accurate. Rather, they’re examples of the various trade-offs and side-effects of evolution. They’re also not physical or psychological limitations per se (like our poor sense of smell or inability to grasp large numbers — those traits weren’t adaptive in our recent evolutionary past).

The Dual Function of the Pharynx

This is one of the most problematic “features” of the human body — and the cause of innumerable deaths throughout human history. Like many other primates, we’re forced to use the same anatomical structure for both ingestion and respiration. But when obstructed, airflow is blocked, which can lead to choking, and in some cases, death.

Our Inability to Biosynthesize Vitamin C

Vitamin C plays a crucial role as an anti-oxidant and in collagen synthesis. But certain animals, such as primates, guinea pigs, and some bats and birds, have completely lost the ability to synthesize this compound. So, when Vitamin C-rich food sources are scarce, such as fruits, we experience a weakened immune response.

Also, because we can’t make all the vitamins we need, we carry a host of deadly bacteria in our bowels, which produce them for us. But when this process is disrupted, like a hole in the intestine, it can flare into peritonitis.

The Close Proximity of our Genitals to our Rectum

Not only is this aesthetically displeasing, it’s also unhygienic. Combined with our short urethras — especially in women — this leads to frequent urinary tract and bladder infections (UTIs) (remember, front to back, ladies).

Our Multi-Function Genitals

Relatedly, our genitals are forced to perform multiple functions. While on the one hand it can be seen as conservation in design, it creates health problems. Again, it’s unhygienic. For women, sexual intercourse pushes bacteria further into the urethra, leading to UTIs. Additionally, both men and women can contract UTIs from two sexually transmitted bacteria, chlamydia and mycoplasma. And of course, for women, this is also the part of the body where, in addition to sex and urination, newborn babies come out.

The Extremely Narrow Human Birth Canal

Speaking of which, human females have an unreasonably narrow birth canal, resulting in significantly increased risks to both mother and child during birth. In fact, death in childbirth used to be the leading cause of death for women during their reproductive years. This is a consequence of our quick evolutionary leap from quadrupeds to bipeds, resulting in our narrow pelvis — the passage through which newborn babies pass.

Our Over-Loaded Lower Backs

This is also a consequence of our transition from four-legged to two-legged creatures. According to paleoanthropologist Bruce Latimer of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio,

When humans stood upright, they took a spine that had evolved to be stiff for climbing and moving in trees and rotated it 90 degrees, so it was vertical. But so as not to obstruct the birth canal and to get the torso balanced above our feet, the spine has to curve inwards, creating the hollow of our backs. That’s why our spines are shaped like an “S.” All that curving, with the weight of the head and stuff we carry stacked on top, creates pressure that causes back problems. “If you take care of it, your spine will get you through to about 40 or 50” said Latimer. “After that, you’re on your own.”

The Overly Complicated Human Foot

Anthropologist Jeremy DeSilva of Boston University put it this way:

Starting with the foot, DeSilva held up a cast with 26 bones and said: “You wouldn’t design it out of 26 moving parts.” Our feet have so many bones because our ape-like ancestors needed flexible feet to grasp branches. But as they moved out of the trees and began walking upright on the ground the foot had to become more stable, and the big toe, which was no longer opposable, aligned itself with the other toes and our ancestors developed an arch to work as a shock absorber. “The foot was modified to remain rigid” said DeSilva. But the bottom line was that our foot still has a lot of room to twist inwards and outwards, and our arches collapse. This results in: ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, shin splints, and broken ankles. These are not modern problems; fossils show broken ankles that have healed as far back as 3 million years ago.

A better design for upright walking and running, DeSilva said, would be a foot and ankle like an ostrich. An ostrich’s ankle and lower leg bones are fused into a single structure, and their foot has only two toes that aid in running. “Why can’t I have a foot like that?” asked DeSilva. One reason is that ostriches trace their upright locomotion back 230 million years to the age of dinosaurs, while our ancestors walked upright just 5 million years ago.

The “Blind Spot” in Our Eyes

Our so-called “blind spot” is the result of a quirk that happens during embryological development. To deal with this, we’ve had to evolve elaborate and costly perception-correcting mechanisms. Esther Inglis-Arkell describes it like this:

Light gets into the eye by passing through the pupil. It hits the retina at the back of the eye. The retina is covered with light-sensing proteins. They relay what they sense to the optic nerve which carries the information back into the brain. The problem is, the optic nerve ends in the field of the retina itself. It creates a dark spot. Most of the time, the other eye will see what’s happening in its partner’s blind, but if the blind spots overlap while looking at a certain object, or if the person is only looking through one eye, the brain just fills in the spot looking at the surrounding picture.

A Single Set of Adult Teeth

This is where evolution got unreasonably cheap on us, providing humans with just one set of teeth for our entire adult lives. Once we hit 35, our teeth start to go — one of many signs that evolution primed us for reproduction, followed by a brief period of child-rearing, and pretty much nothing else.

Our fondness for sweet, salty, and fatty foods

Our bodies need sugar, salt, and fat — just not in extreme quantities. But in a state of nature, these foods are often scarce or difficult to preserve. That’s why we find these food unreasonably delicious and irresistible. But most of us now live in a world of tremendous abundance, and we consume these foods in ridiculous quantities, leading to all sorts of modern health problems.

Tribalism

Humans have a kind of ingrained fear or distrust of the “out-group”. It’s a previously adaptive trait that binds small groups of individuals together and prevents them from wandering off or joining other groups. But it also leads to ethnocentrism and divisions between groups. Studies show that oxytocin, while strengthening feelings of trust between individuals, increases fear of “the other”. This characteristic was obviously important back when we lived in family clans or tribal arrangements, but today it leads to all sorts of social problems, including racism, prejudice, and our inability to empathize with people we don’t immediately know.

Any Number of Cognitive Biases

Many of our cognitive biases — annoying glitches in our thinking that cause us to make questionable decisions and reach erroneous conclusions — are a consequence of our limited intelligence and predisposed tendencies. Examples include the confirmation bias (we love to agree with people who agree with us), our tendency to neglect or misjudge probability, and the status-quo bias (we often make choices that guarantee that things remain the same). Some of these are adaptive traits, but others are simply cognitive deficiencies.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

This is an example of how we’ve potentially pathologized a perfectly “normal” human psychological characteristic. Because ADHD appears to have a genetic component (it affects about 5% of school-aged children), questions have been raised about its prior role as a trait required for survival, namely its adaptive function in hunter, fighter, and wader theories. But today, we see it as something maladaptive — something that needs to be treated. Put another way, and like our penchant for sweet, salty, and fatty foods, it’s a trait that’s not so much nonoptimal as it’s ill suited for present-day society.

[source]

(via jangojips)